About

What is arc?

ARC is the Amphibian and Reptile Conservancy. We are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit focused on identifying and conserving the highest priority places for amphibians and reptiles in the United States. We protect endangered amphibians and reptiles through a strategic, scientific, and passionate approach that allows us to make a real difference.

We implement localized, on the ground conservation projects in PARCAs (Priority Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Areas) and weave them together across the country into a national strategy capable of making great impact. We act with the urgency required to save those species and ecosystems at greatest risk.

We believe the conservation of amphibians, reptiles, and the habitats they depend on is vitally important. In these important areas, we develop dynamic conservation programs that recover priority species, improve habitats, and ultimately restore ecosystems.

Bog Turtle

Oh, to be a hatchling bog turtle, soaking up the last days of fall sun before retreating under frozen mud to await warmer spring days. Enviable.

©José Garrido

northern red salamander

The state salamander of Virginia (no, really)

© Mike Martin

Why amphibians and reptiles?

Sonoran Coachwhip

This Sonoran coachwhip is escaping the humdrum of everyday life on the ground in search for the best view in the boulderfield. Real estate like this is covetted among everybody, even snakes.

© Nathan Shepard

Imperiled, misunderstood, and vitally important

Amphibians and reptiles are among the most threatened vertebrate groups in the world, experiencing rapid declines across the United States and beyond. While the causes for decline are multifaceted, all are grounded in one simple fact: As a society, we often don’t pay attention to critical elements of our ecosystem until it’s too late and they are lost forever. When amphibians and reptiles disappear forever, we not only lose an incredibly fascinating group of animals—we lose the glue that holds our healthy ecosystems together. The need for action has never been more urgent.

Want to learn more about conservation? See our work.
Why?
It’s more than practical.

For us, it's personal For us, it's personal For us, it's personal For us, it's personal

It's personal

American Bullfrog

The American bullfrog is a voracious predator. Luckily, it looks like she has this one under control.

© Steve Atkins, Fox Cove Photography

We deeply value a world in which a child can experience the wonder of finding a wild box turtle. Where flipping a rock in a stream uncovers a bright red salamander. We can’t fathom a world without these things. There are a million reasons why it’s environmentally practical to conserve amphibians and reptiles, but these childhood memories help drive our mission. Protecting healthy habitats and ecosystems for future generations means the world will never lose this sense of wonder and adventure—and, perhaps more importantly, it preserves a connection to nature and to something larger than ourselves.

Wild encounters with these fascinating and enthralling creatures are priceless memories that must be preserved.​ ARC's targeted conservation programs that protect ailing ecosystems make it possible for amphibians and reptiles to survive and thrive.

After all, people will only work to protect the things that they value and love. To protect the environment for the future, we must help children to value and love these priceless creatures.

team arc

ARC is led by an extremely dedicated and talented crew of conservationists. With wide-ranging skill sets, from hardcore science and policy to those who specialize in partnerships and awareness, we are building integrative conservation programs across the country and leading them with action and innovative methodology. Together, we can redefine what is possible in the realm of amphibian, reptile, and habitat conservation.

Experts in the field

Team & Board Members
© Erin Adams
JJ Apodaca
Executive Director

As executive director, Dr. JJ Apodaca leverages his 15+ years of research experience to develop and inform optimal conservation and management decisions for the organization. Focusing on imperiled species, his research and conservation work combines several fields and methods ranging from genetics to habitat modeling and life history studies. He has held leadership roles with the Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation network, serving as co-chair in the Southeast for two years and nationally for four to improve conservation efforts with federal and state agencies, private landowners, and nonprofit organizations. JJ has a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from the University of South Florida and a doctorate in biology from the University of Alabama, where his dissertation work focused on prioritizing areas important to the conservation of amphibians in the Southeast at both the macro and micro scales.

Jeff Holmes
Founding Director

Jeff Holmes began his conservation career more than two decades ago with The Nature Conservancy of Tennessee, where he quickly advanced from land steward to zoologist before being tapped as conservation planning manager and then director of conservation planning. During his tenure with the organization, Jeff led or participated in numerous field studies and played a key role in the development and utilization of innovative conservation planning tools and protocols both within Tennessee and throughout the southeastern United States. After leaving The Nature Conservancy in 2003, Jeff has led cutting-edge projects as a private contractor to design and implement universal conservation planning tools and protocols that are compatible across multiple agencies and organizations at multiple scales, regardless of land-use priorities.

© Ron Grunwald
Eitan Grunwald
Financial Officer and Treasurer

A strategic consultant with a career spanning over four decades, Eitan Grunwald combines his business acumen with a lifelong passion for herpetology in his role with ARC. He previously worked in private practice as a hands-on advisor to small businesses and nonprofits in need of operational troubleshooting, restructuring, business planning and professional management. Prior to offering consulting services, Eitan spent years in senior management as an executive for for-profit corporations and social impact organizations. Now retired, his volunteer work for ARC extends into the field, where he surveys for rare species in South Carolina. Eitan holds a Master’s degree in Organizational Dynamics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Anne Conner
Development Director

Anne is passionate about species and habitat conservation and has a particular fondness for herps having had her first amazing experience with blue indigo snakes and turtles in Florida as a child. Prior to work in the non-profit sector, she worked as an equity investment analyst and as a research assistant to the Director of Research at the Harvard Business School. She has worked in the field of philanthropy as a development professional for the past 25 years. Anne comes to the position of ARC Development Director having focused her work particularly on international science and conservation initiatives including the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization and the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission among others with a particular expertise in major gift fundraising, research, and analysis.  Anne currently resides in Boston, Massachusetts where her interests extend to historic preservation and the gardening of heirloom plants.

© José Garrido
José Garrido
Conservation Program Coordinator

José is a Cuban-American ecologist, passionate about the study and conservation of all North American flora, fauna, and fungi. Growing up at the foot of the Blue Ridge mountains, he fell in love with herps when he witnessed his first spotted salamander migration. After he received his bachelor’s degree in Ecology from Appalachian State University, he traveled the country in an off-grid campervan, working for many years as a field technician with numerous federal, state, and private organizations. Eager to refine his skills, he earned a master’s degree from Central Washington University comparing the ecology of urban and wild Jalisco mud turtle populations. José now lives in Knoxville, Tennessee, lured back by Appalachia’s unparalleled salamander diversity. Here, he worked with JJ on several projects including bog turtles, hellbenders, and green salamanders before becoming ARC’s Conservation Program Coordinator. You can still probably find him somewhere outdoors, likely covered in mud, and happy as can be.

Sydney Sheedy
Assistant Field Project Manager

As early as she can remember, Sydney has always wanted to work with nature, animals, and conservation. While growing up, the job title may have changed many times (i.e. Steve Irwin’s assistant); however, the end goals were always the same. By the time she was in college, she knew she wanted to major in Wildlife Biology with a minor in Conservation. She migrated from her home in Arizona to Colorado State University where she graduated with a Bachelor of Science in 2007. Her first field job out of college was as a sea turtle technician on the Georgia Coast where she biked 18 miles a day on a secluded beach looking for turtle nests. As a result, she was hooked on field work. The following years provided her with the privilege of working with a variety of species and agencies, and allowed her to visit amazing places such as the Galapagos, Alaska, and Peru. She started as a volunteer for ARC in 2016 and was hired in 2019 as a field assistant. Working for ARC has been an adventure that is constantly expanding her knowledge and teaching her new skills. She looks forward to continuing her education in conservation, applying all that she has learned about adaptive management, and building ongoing relationships with ARC’s partners.

 

When she is not working in the forest, you can still find her out in nature. She particularly enjoys spending time on South Carolina’s lovely beaches or kayaking in the marsh. She also enjoys trying to keep up with her son and taking her on escapades with her partner Ben to visit new areas, friends, and family.

Ben Morrison
Field Project Manager

Ben has always had a broad interest in nature and conservation. After studying ecology at the University of Georgia, he held jobs in such fields as wildlife biology, environmental education, and land management. From educating the public as a naturalist, to improving critical habitat with prescribed fire, to working on various projects as a wildlife technician, he has learned and appreciated how important it is to have an integrated approach to conservation. In his herpetology career he has been lucky enough to work with beautiful and fascinating species including bog turtles, hellbenders, timber rattlesnakes, and loggerhead sea turtles. He is currently working hard to identify and assist with the implementation and monitoring of conservation measures to protect imperiled species such as gopher frogs, eastern diamondback rattlesnakes, spotted turtles, southern hognose snakes, and pine snakes. In his spare time he enjoys music, fishing, and blowing up pumpkins.

Christine Deem
Digital Communications Manager

Christine’s interest in herps first began when she was a student intern at the San Diego Zoo’s Desert Tortoise Conservation Center. While completing her bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Christine spent much of her time as a research assistant and was involved in several conservation-focused organizations, including being selected for a role at Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, DC. Following graduation, she continued to make an impact in these organizations through volunteer work and eventually accepted a full-time position in development at the Wildlife Conservation Society in New York City. After these experiences, Christine spent much of her career as a marketing executive in the for-profit industry. At ARC, she is able to combine her marketing skills with her passion for conservation to help spread ARC’s powerful mission to the world and make a difference for vulnerable amphibians and reptiles. Christine also holds a master’s degree in business from UNLV and is looking forward to graduating with her master’s degree in biology from Miami University in the near future. She resides in Las Vegas, Nevada with her husband and two dogs.

Priya Nanjappa
Board Chair

Priya Nanjappa is a wildlife biologist and herpetologist with nearly 20 years of experience in applied conservation and policy. Working at the state, national and international scales, she connects the dots across different projects to move conservation work beyond talk and into action. In her prior role as a program manager for the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and national coordinator for Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, she worked closely with state and federal agency decision-makers, academic institutions, NGOs, and private partners. Priya holds a Bachelor of Science degree in wildlife biology from Iowa State University and a Master of Science from Ball State University, where she developed the first-ever national database of amphibian distributions and associated maps.

Sarah Cross Owen
Board Member

As the first herpetologist for the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, Sarah successfully inaugurated the state’s Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation chapter. In addition to conducting several research projects to better understand the reptile and amphibian populations of the state, she helped pass laws to protect venomous species from exploitation and prevent over-harvesting of freshwater turtles. She is also the co-author of “The Frogs and Toads of North Carolina,” a long-awaited field identification guide that showcases the colors, shapes, sizes and sounds of these diverse amphibian populations. Sarah is a graduate of the University of the South and the University of Georgia, where she earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees studying wildlife and herpetology.

Jimmy Bullock
Board Member

An award-winning conservation leader, Jimmy Bullock oversees sustainable forestry, environmental policy and programs, and advocacy on forestry issues as senior vice president of forest sustainability for Resource Management Service, LLC. His work has been recognized by organizations including the American Forest and Paper Association, which presented him with the prestigious Forest Stewardship Award for his role in conservation of the Louisiana Black Bear. A certified wildlife biologist and Mississippi registered forester, he is on the board of directors for several other organizations, including the National Conservation Leadership Institute. Jimmy earned his Bachelor of Science in forestry from Mississippi State University in 1980 and his Master of Science in wildlife ecology from Mississippi State in 1982.

Whitfield Gibbons
Board Member

A prolific author and editor, Whit Gibbons has produced an award-winning series of books on southeastern reptiles and amphibians and published more than 250 articles in scientific journals. His weekly environmental column, “Ecoviews,” is syndicated in newspapers across the United States. He is a professor emeritus at the University of Georgia’s Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and served as a founding member of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation in 1999. Throughout his career, he has been an avid proponent of outreach and public education, championing the need to connect research to society so that stakeholders can become engaged in conservation of their natural heritage and resources. Whit received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in biology from the University of Alabama and a doctorate in zoology from Michigan State University.

Marvin Moriarty
Board Member

Marvin Moriarty began his nearly 40-year conservation career with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, working as a biologist on the Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, as well as in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia. He served in multiple leadership roles across the country within the agency, handling national conservation policy, budgets, and resource management before retiring in 2011 as the director of the northeast region. Over the span of his distinguished career, Marvin fostered collaboration and information sharing among stakeholders to achieve conservation goals. He currently continues this practice as the co-chair of the Friends of Silvio O. Conte National Wildlife Refuge Science and Stewardship Committee and as a member of the board of Audubon International. Marvin holds a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from St. Joseph’s College, Philadelphia.

Brian Todd
Board Member

Brian Todd is an associate professor in the department of wildlife, fish and conservation biology at the University of California, Davis. He has focused his career on the study of anthropogenic impacts to amphibian and reptile populations and continues to conduct research on the threats that most affect these species in North America. In 2003, he joined Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation and became engaged in the regional and national efforts to support conservation of these species. He holds a doctorate in ecology and a master’s degree in conservation ecology and sustainable development, both from the University of Georgia.

David Proctor
Board Member

A caring human and calculated risk-taker, David Proctor recognizes opportunity amid challenge and parses data to reveal hidden truths. He leveraged these skills at Jane Street Capital, where he created innovative programs and structure that helped the company become one of the most successful quant-based trading firms worldwide. Today, he applies those skills to attack societal problems and strives to create an equal starting line for all. From bringing skateparks to children across the country to research and initiatives that advance the scientific and social understanding of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), David’s service is driven by a belief that every person deserves the opportunity to reach their full potential. He is also an ardent supporter of our planet’s ecosystem and works closely with organizations that protect the fragile balance of insects, amphibians, reptiles, and other critical species.

David Swartz
Board Member

Over the last 30+ years, Dave Swartz’s award-winning career has spanned public relations, advertising, marketing, brand development, product development, business development, mobile technology, augmented and virtual reality, emerging technologies, and philanthropy. A creative and tech visionary, Dave is the co-founder of MEDL Mobile, a custom mobile development shop that has launched more than 400 technologies and platforms for a storied list of brands, startups, athletes, and celebrities. He is designated as the inventor or co-inventor on several technology patents and served as the vice chair of the board of directors of The Developers Alliance, which represents more than 70,000 software engineers and developers. In his current role as chief vision officer at Anonymous Philanthropy, Dave helps families, foundations, and corporations leverage their resources to address wide-ranging critical issues that they feel can best impact the world, including global human rights, food insecurity, second chance employment, childhood adversity, child safety, environmental protection, and regional economic prosperity.

© Erin Adams
JJ Apodaca
Executive Director

As executive director, Dr. JJ Apodaca leverages his 15+ years of research experience to develop and inform optimal conservation and management decisions for the organization. Focusing on imperiled species, his research and conservation work combines several fields and methods ranging from genetics to habitat modeling and life history studies. He has held leadership roles with the Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation network, serving as co-chair in the Southeast for two years and nationally for four to improve conservation efforts with federal and state agencies, private landowners, and nonprofit organizations. JJ has a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from the University of South Florida and a doctorate in biology from the University of Alabama, where his dissertation work focused on prioritizing areas important to the conservation of amphibians in the Southeast at both the macro and micro scales.

Jeff Holmes
Founding Director

Jeff Holmes began his conservation career more than two decades ago with The Nature Conservancy of Tennessee, where he quickly advanced from land steward to zoologist before being tapped as conservation planning manager and then director of conservation planning. During his tenure with the organization, Jeff led or participated in numerous field studies and played a key role in the development and utilization of innovative conservation planning tools and protocols both within Tennessee and throughout the southeastern United States. After leaving The Nature Conservancy in 2003, Jeff has led cutting-edge projects as a private contractor to design and implement universal conservation planning tools and protocols that are compatible across multiple agencies and organizations at multiple scales, regardless of land-use priorities.

© Ron Grunwald
Eitan Grunwald
Financial Officer and Treasurer

A strategic consultant with a career spanning over four decades, Eitan Grunwald combines his business acumen with a lifelong passion for herpetology in his role with ARC. He previously worked in private practice as a hands-on advisor to small businesses and nonprofits in need of operational troubleshooting, restructuring, business planning and professional management. Prior to offering consulting services, Eitan spent years in senior management as an executive for for-profit corporations and social impact organizations. Now retired, his volunteer work for ARC extends into the field, where he surveys for rare species in South Carolina. Eitan holds a Master’s degree in Organizational Dynamics from the University of Pennsylvania.

Anne Conner
Development Director

Anne is passionate about species and habitat conservation and has a particular fondness for herps having had her first amazing experience with blue indigo snakes and turtles in Florida as a child. Prior to work in the non-profit sector, she worked as an equity investment analyst and as a research assistant to the Director of Research at the Harvard Business School. She has worked in the field of philanthropy as a development professional for the past 25 years. Anne comes to the position of ARC Development Director having focused her work particularly on international science and conservation initiatives including the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization and the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission among others with a particular expertise in major gift fundraising, research, and analysis.  Anne currently resides in Boston, Massachusetts where her interests extend to historic preservation and the gardening of heirloom plants.

© José Garrido
José Garrido
Conservation Program Director

José is a Cuban-American ecologist, passionate about the study and conservation of all North American flora, fauna, and fungi. Growing up at the foot of the Blue Ridge mountains, he fell in love with herps when he witnessed his first spotted salamander migration. After he received his bachelor’s degree in Ecology from Appalachian State University, he traveled the country in an off-grid campervan, working for many years as a field technician with numerous federal, state, and private organizations. Eager to refine his skills, he earned a master’s degree from Central Washington University comparing the ecology of urban and wild Jalisco mud turtle populations. José now lives in Knoxville, Tennessee, lured back by Appalachia’s unparalleled salamander diversity. Here, he worked with JJ on several projects including bog turtles, hellbenders, and green salamanders before becoming ARC’s Conservation Program Coordinator. You can still probably find him somewhere outdoors, likely covered in mud, and happy as can be.

Sydney Sheedy
Assistant Field Project Manager

As early as she can remember, Sydney has always wanted to work with nature, animals, and conservation. While growing up, the job title may have changed many times (i.e. Steve Irwin’s assistant); however, the end goals were always the same. By the time she was in college, she knew she wanted to major in Wildlife Biology with a minor in Conservation. She migrated from her home in Arizona to Colorado State University where she graduated with a Bachelor of Science in 2007. Her first field job out of college was as a sea turtle technician on the Georgia Coast where she biked 18 miles a day on a secluded beach looking for turtle nests. As a result, she was hooked on field work. The following years provided her with the privilege of working with a variety of species and agencies, and allowed her to visit amazing places such as the Galapagos, Alaska, and Peru. She started as a volunteer for ARC in 2016 and was hired in 2019 as a field assistant. Working for ARC has been an adventure that is constantly expanding her knowledge and teaching her new skills. She looks forward to continuing her education in conservation, applying all that she has learned about adaptive management, and building ongoing relationships with ARC’s partners.

 

When she is not working in the forest, you can still find her out in nature. She particularly enjoys spending time on South Carolina’s lovely beaches or kayaking in the marsh. She also enjoys trying to keep up with her son and taking her on escapades with her partner Ben to visit new areas, friends, and family.

Ben Morrison
Field Project Manager

Ben has always had a broad interest in nature and conservation. After studying ecology at the University of Georgia, he held jobs in such fields as wildlife biology, environmental education, and land management. From educating the public as a naturalist, to improving critical habitat with prescribed fire, to working on various projects as a wildlife technician, he has learned and appreciated how important it is to have an integrated approach to conservation. In his herpetology career he has been lucky enough to work with beautiful and fascinating species including bog turtles, hellbenders, timber rattlesnakes, and loggerhead sea turtles. He is currently working hard to identify and assist with the implementation and monitoring of conservation measures to protect imperiled species such as gopher frogs, eastern diamondback rattlesnakes, spotted turtles, southern hognose snakes, and pine snakes. In his spare time he enjoys music, fishing, and blowing up pumpkins.

Christine Deem
Digital Communications Manager

Christine’s interest in herps first began when she was a student intern at the San Diego Zoo’s Desert Tortoise Conservation Center. While completing her bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), Christine spent much of her time as a research assistant and was involved in several conservation-focused organizations, including being selected for a role at Smithsonian’s National Zoo in Washington, DC. Following graduation, she continued to make an impact in these organizations through volunteer work and eventually accepted a full-time position in development at the Wildlife Conservation Society in New York City. After these experiences, Christine spent much of her career as a marketing executive in the for-profit industry. At ARC, she is able to combine her marketing skills with her passion for conservation to help spread ARC’s powerful mission to the world and make a difference for vulnerable amphibians and reptiles. Christine also holds a master’s degree in business from UNLV and is looking forward to graduating with her master’s degree in biology from Miami University in the near future. She resides in Las Vegas, Nevada with her husband and two dogs.

Priya Nanjappa
Board Chair

Priya Nanjappa is a wildlife biologist and herpetologist with nearly 20 years of experience in applied conservation and policy. Working at the state, national and international scales, she connects the dots across different projects to move conservation work beyond talk and into action. In her prior role as a program manager for the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies and national coordinator for Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation, she worked closely with state and federal agency decision-makers, academic institutions, NGOs, and private partners. Priya holds a Bachelor of Science degree in wildlife biology from Iowa State University and a Master of Science from Ball State University, where she developed the first-ever national database of amphibian distributions and associated maps.

Sarah Cross Owen
Board Member

As the first herpetologist for the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, Sarah successfully inaugurated the state’s Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation chapter. In addition to conducting several research projects to better understand the reptile and amphibian populations of the state, she helped pass laws to protect venomous species from exploitation and prevent over-harvesting of freshwater turtles. She is also the co-author of “The Frogs and Toads of North Carolina,” a long-awaited field identification guide that showcases the colors, shapes, sizes and sounds of these diverse amphibian populations. Sarah is a graduate of the University of the South and the University of Georgia, where she earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees studying wildlife and herpetology.

Jimmy Bullock
Board Member

An award-winning conservation leader, Jimmy Bullock oversees sustainable forestry, environmental policy and programs, and advocacy on forestry issues as senior vice president of forest sustainability for Resource Management Service, LLC. His work has been recognized by organizations including the American Forest and Paper Association, which presented him with the prestigious Forest Stewardship Award for his role in conservation of the Louisiana Black Bear. A certified wildlife biologist and Mississippi registered forester, he is on the board of directors for several other organizations, including the National Conservation Leadership Institute. Jimmy earned his Bachelor of Science in forestry from Mississippi State University in 1980 and his Master of Science in wildlife ecology from Mississippi State in 1982.

Whitfield Gibbons
Board Member

A prolific author and editor, Whit Gibbons has produced an award-winning series of books on southeastern reptiles and amphibians and published more than 250 articles in scientific journals. His weekly environmental column, “Ecoviews,” is syndicated in newspapers across the United States. He is a professor emeritus at the University of Georgia’s Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and served as a founding member of Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation in 1999. Throughout his career, he has been an avid proponent of outreach and public education, championing the need to connect research to society so that stakeholders can become engaged in conservation of their natural heritage and resources. Whit received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in biology from the University of Alabama and a doctorate in zoology from Michigan State University.

Marvin Moriarty
Board Member

Marvin Moriarty began his nearly 40-year conservation career with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, working as a biologist on the Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, as well as in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia. He served in multiple leadership roles across the country within the agency, handling national conservation policy, budgets, and resource management before retiring in 2011 as the director of the northeast region. Over the span of his distinguished career, Marvin fostered collaboration and information sharing among stakeholders to achieve conservation goals. He currently continues this practice as the co-chair of the Friends of Silvio O. Conte National Wildlife Refuge Science and Stewardship Committee and as a member of the board of Audubon International. Marvin holds a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from St. Joseph’s College, Philadelphia.

Brian Todd
Board Member

Brian Todd is an associate professor in the department of wildlife, fish and conservation biology at the University of California, Davis. He has focused his career on the study of anthropogenic impacts to amphibian and reptile populations and continues to conduct research on the threats that most affect these species in North America. In 2003, he joined Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation and became engaged in the regional and national efforts to support conservation of these species. He holds a doctorate in ecology and a master’s degree in conservation ecology and sustainable development, both from the University of Georgia.

David Proctor
Board Member

A caring human and calculated risk-taker, David Proctor recognizes opportunity amid challenge and parses data to reveal hidden truths. He leveraged these skills at Jane Street Capital, where he created innovative programs and structure that helped the company become one of the most successful quant-based trading firms worldwide. Today, he applies those skills to attack societal problems and strives to create an equal starting line for all. From bringing skateparks to children across the country to research and initiatives that advance the scientific and social understanding of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), David’s service is driven by a belief that every person deserves the opportunity to reach their full potential. He is also an ardent supporter of our planet’s ecosystem and works closely with organizations that protect the fragile balance of insects, amphibians, reptiles, and other critical species.

David Swartz
Board Member

Over the last 30+ years, Dave Swartz’s award-winning career has spanned public relations, advertising, marketing, brand development, product development, business development, mobile technology, augmented and virtual reality, emerging technologies, and philanthropy. A creative and tech visionary, Dave is the co-founder of MEDL Mobile, a custom mobile development shop that has launched more than 400 technologies and platforms for a storied list of brands, startups, athletes, and celebrities. He is designated as the inventor or co-inventor on several technology patents and served as the vice chair of the board of directors of The Developers Alliance, which represents more than 70,000 software engineers and developers. In his current role as chief vision officer at Anonymous Philanthropy, Dave helps families, foundations, and corporations leverage their resources to address wide-ranging critical issues that they feel can best impact the world, including global human rights, food insecurity, second chance employment, childhood adversity, child safety, environmental protection, and regional economic prosperity.